Top Ten Tuesday: Fall Reads

Happy Autumn!

Being the first day of fall, it’s fitting that this week’s Top Ten Tuesday prompt is books to read this fall. I don’t usually decide what I’m going to read based on the season (unless it’s Christmas time), but here are my top ten (in no particular order). Many of these have previously appeared on my to-read lists, but maybe this time I will actually get around to them!

1. Lean In by Sheryl Sandberg

2. All That Is by James Salter

3. Night by Elie Wiesel

5. The Wind in the Willows by Kenneth Grahame

6. El Deafo by Cece Bell

7. We Are Water by Wally Lamb

8. The Circle by Dave Eggers

9. Middlesex by Jeffrey Eugenides

10. The Glass Castle by Jeannette Walls

That’s it for me! What’s on your to-read list this fall? And which of these should I read first?!

Advertisements

Book Review: The Time Machine

I’ve been on a science fiction kick lately and decided it was finally time to go back to how it all began—The Time Machine. This short novel by H.G. Wells was published in 1895 and popularized the concept of time travel. While I think our idea of time travel has changed a bit since then, it is definitely easy to see science fiction’s roots in this work.

I really enjoyed the beginning of the book and Wells’ explanation of time being a dimension, like physical planes. I thought it was a sophisticated and convincing argument for being able to travel through time, as you would through physical space. At the same time, I wish there was more explanation about the consequences of such travel—could you change the past? Determine the future? Grow older while living the same day over and over again?

Continue Reading

Book Review: Between Shades of Gray

No, this book is not related in any way to Fifty Shades of Grey (although perhaps it should have been given a different name). Between Shades of Gray is actually an emotional and traumatic tale of a Lithuanian girl living in a Soviet labor camp during World War II. It has all of the elements of a great YA novel, with the added impact of an important historical message.

Continue Reading

Page the Bookstore Cat

It’s been awhile, but Caturday posts are back! Today I’d like to introduce you to a special bookstore employee–Page the cat!

Page was rescued by the owners of Book Buyers, a bookstore in North Carolina, when she was abandoned by a dumpster as a kitten. Now Page spends her days welcoming customers and sleeping on bookshelves.

She probably also has some great book recommendations, such as I Could Pee on This or Crafting with Cat Hair.

I’d love to visit this bookstore and play with Page!

 

Book vs. Movie: The Fault in Our Stars


Before The Fault in Our Stars was released in theaters this past weekend, there were millions of readers worrying whether the book was adapted with as much care and heart as it deserved. The book, written by John Green, means a great deal to many people, and it’s always scary when something so close to you is taken and made big for the whole world to see.

Continue Reading

Top Ten Books in My Beach Bag

Top Ten Tuesday is an original feature/weekly meme created at The Broke and the Bookish. Each week they post a new Top Ten list prompt that bloggers anywhere can answer!

I’m going to Greece for two weeks in just over a month, so I need to start thinking about what I’m going to read while chilling by the Aegean sea. Luckily, this week’s Top Ten Tuesday theme is beach reads. Here are the books I have come up with so far. They aren’t necessarily lighthearted beach reads, but ones that have been on my to-read list for awhile. Let me know if you have any suggestions to fill my bag!

Continue Reading

Re-Read & Review: The Fault in Our Stars

In case you’ve been living on the moon for the past two years, The Fault in Our Stars is a wildly popular YA novel by John Green about two teenagers, Hazel and Augustus, who are living with cancer and falling for each other. It explores the awkwardness of young love, the “side effects” of dying, and the meaning (if there is any) of life. I first read TFiOS when it was published over two years ago, but I never wrote a review on it. With the movie adaptation coming out in less than a week, I decided to re-read the book and write down my thoughts on it.

I recently read Esther Earl’s posthumous book, This Star Won’t Go Out, and it definitely affected my re-read of TFiOS. TFiOS is dedicated to Esther, who died of cancer as a teenager and was friends with John Green. Her book is a compilation of letters and journal entries, which chronicle many of the same fears that Hazel and Gus struggle with in TFiOS. Esther was afraid of dying without having made a difference in the world, and Gus, similarly, is afraid of oblivion. Hazel worries what will happen to her parents after she dies, and much of Esther’s writing is concerned with how her illness affects her family. Hazel is clearly not Esther, as John Green has continually said, but the book is definitely inspired by her spirit and a tribute to her life.

Continue Reading