Book Review: Between Shades of Gray

No, this book is not related in any way to Fifty Shades of Grey (although perhaps it should have been given a different name). Between Shades of Gray is actually an emotional and traumatic tale of a Lithuanian girl living in a Soviet labor camp during World War II. It has all of the elements of a great YA novel, with the added impact of an important historical message.

Continue Reading

Advertisements

Book vs. Movie: The Fault in Our Stars


Before The Fault in Our Stars was released in theaters this past weekend, there were millions of readers worrying whether the book was adapted with as much care and heart as it deserved. The book, written by John Green, means a great deal to many people, and it’s always scary when something so close to you is taken and made big for the whole world to see.

Continue Reading

Re-Read & Review: The Fault in Our Stars

In case you’ve been living on the moon for the past two years, The Fault in Our Stars is a wildly popular YA novel by John Green about two teenagers, Hazel and Augustus, who are living with cancer and falling for each other. It explores the awkwardness of young love, the “side effects” of dying, and the meaning (if there is any) of life. I first read TFiOS when it was published over two years ago, but I never wrote a review on it. With the movie adaptation coming out in less than a week, I decided to re-read the book and write down my thoughts on it.

I recently read Esther Earl’s posthumous book, This Star Won’t Go Out, and it definitely affected my re-read of TFiOS. TFiOS is dedicated to Esther, who died of cancer as a teenager and was friends with John Green. Her book is a compilation of letters and journal entries, which chronicle many of the same fears that Hazel and Gus struggle with in TFiOS. Esther was afraid of dying without having made a difference in the world, and Gus, similarly, is afraid of oblivion. Hazel worries what will happen to her parents after she dies, and much of Esther’s writing is concerned with how her illness affects her family. Hazel is clearly not Esther, as John Green has continually said, but the book is definitely inspired by her spirit and a tribute to her life.

Continue Reading

Fantastic Fictional Friendships

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

Okay, so I’m a little late for The Broke and the Bookish‘s Top Ten Tuesday. But I started writing this post yesterday, so it still counts, right?

The theme this week was top ten books about friendship.

I think it can actually be really hard to create a realistic friendship in a book. Friendship is defined by intricacies like inside jokes, nicknames, and silly quirks that can be hard for an “outsider” to understand. The books that succeed at depicting friendship, in my opinion, are ones that make the reader feel like he or she is part of that friendship. Here are my picks:

Continue Reading

Book Review: Allegiant

I finished the Divergent series over a week ago, but it’s taken me awhile to write this review because I honestly don’t have too much to say. Unfortunately, Veronica Roth didn’t improve upon Insurgent‘s mistakes in Allegiant. While I didn’t hate the ending as much as most people did, I still felt like the whole book was just mediocre and didn’t live up to the hype started by the first book.

Continue Reading

Book Review: Insurgent

Ugh. I believed in you, Veronica Roth. I was captivated by the world you created in Divergent, and I couldn’t wait to get my hands on Insurgent. But now I’m trying to understand how you turned something so enjoyable into something so frustrating. I finished reading Insurgent last night and all that came to mind was: ugh.

Continue Reading

Book Challenge Day 22: A Tear-Jerker

the fault in our stars coverAfter writing my 30-Day Book Challenge post about Bridge to Terabithia on Friday, it’s tempting to just use that book again for today’s post. But there are several other books that have brought me to tears, so instead I have chosen to write about one that has been very popular and will soon be a movie: The Fault in Our Stars.

Continue Reading